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Ferrari confirms Bruni's departure, WEC seat taken by Pier Guidi

GT star Gianmaria Bruni’s departure from Ferrari has been confirmed by the Italian manufacturer, with his seat being taken by Alessandro Pier Guidi

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DHS head Kelly: Trump is preparing a new 'streamlined' immigration ban

John Kelly

A new version of a Trump administration travel ban will be “streamlined,” U.S. Secretary for Homeland Security John Kelly said on Saturday.

Kelly told the Munich Security Conference that the new order would not stop green card residency holders or travelers already on planes from entering the United States. 

“I would say the president is contemplating releasing a tighter, more streamlined version,” he said.

U.S. President Donald Trump’s initial attempt to clamp down for security reasons on immigration from seven Muslim-majority countries and on refugees snarled to a halt amid a judicial backlash and chaos at airports.

Trump’s original order, which he said was meant to head off attacks by Islamist militants, barred people from Iran, Iraq, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria and Yemen from entering for 90 days and excluded all refugees for 120 days, except those from Syria, who were banned indefinitely.

Last week, the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals denied the government’s emergency appeal to lift the Temporary Restraining Order (TRO) on Trump’s immigration order issued last week by a federal judge in Seattle, indicating in its opinion that Trump’s past comments about a “Muslim ban” can be used as evidence for discrimination.

The Trump administration originally said it would appeal the federal appeals court ruling, but Trump has since said he would issue a new order addressing some of the issues raised by court decisions against the ban.

trump immigration ban protest

Kelly said that the administration had been surprised by the ruling and would try to do better. 

I “will have opportunity to work (on) a rollout plan, in particular to make sure that there’s no one in a sense caught in the system of moving from overseas to our airports,” Kelly said.

Asked whether green card residency permit holders would be allowed in, Kelly said: “It’s a good assumption and, as far as the visas go, … if they’re in motion from some distant land to the United States, when they arrive they will be allowed in.”

He promised “a short phase-in period to make sure that people on the other end don’t get on airplanes. But if they’re on an airplane and inbound, they’ll be allowed to enter the country.”

The abrupt implementation of the order last month plunged the immigration system into chaos, sparking a wave of criticism from the countries affected, and from Western allies and some of America’s leading corporations, especially technology firms.

(Reporting By Shadia Nasralla; Editing by Kevin Liffey)

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Logano leads NASCAR Daytona 500 practice as Earnhardt Jr returns

Team Penske Ford driver Joey Logano topped practice ahead of next weekend’s Daytona 500, as Dale Earnhardt Jr returned to competitive NASCAR Cup action following the concussion he suffered last year

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Abt driver di Grassi takes first Formula E pole in Buenos Aires

Lucas di Grassi put aside an earlier practice crash to take his first ever Formula E pole position at Buenos Aires

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Bruni set to miss WEC as Ferrari prevent Porsche move for 2017

Gianmaria Bruni is set to have to sit out the entire World Endurance Championship season in 2017, after officially terminating his Ferrari contract in order to move to rival GT squad Porsche

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Denny Hamlin fastest in Daytona NASCAR Clash practice

Last year’s Daytona 500 and Clash race winner Denny Hamlin was fastest in Friday’s main practice session ahead of the first NASCAR Cup weekend of the season

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Model Denise Bidot Flaunts Her Stretch Marks in the Pages of Sports Illustrated

Sports Illustrated’s 2017 Swimsuit Issue is boundary breaking. True, it has its flaws. White, slim, cis-gender model Kate Upton graces all three of the ostensibly diversity-driven issue’s covers, causing some to wonder if SI’s efforts towards inclusion are simply a publicity grab — or, as Hari Nef would put it, part of “diversity day.” (After all, it wasn’t until two years ago that the men’s magazine thought to include a plus-size model, and even then she occupied ad space, not a feature. After the ad met with tons of positive press, Ashley Graham got her cover.)

Still, politics and marketing tactics aside, visibility is everything and this year’s swim edition has it all: models of varying ages, sizes and races, “everyday women” (thanks to Swimsuits for All’s “Every Body, Every Age, Every Beautiful” ad campaign), the curviest rookie in SI history and, last but not least, stretch marks.

The 2017 Swimsuit Issue features a Denise Bidot-fronted ad for Cacique, Lane Bryant’s swimwear line. In the ad, Bidot poses in a navy blue, nautical-themed bikini. But it’s not the suit’s cute anchor pattern that has the Internet shouting with joy. Like Aerie before them, Lane Bryant appears to have sworn off Photoshop. The photo — which went viral shortly after Bidot posted it to Instagram — is completely unretouched, revealing the model’s stretch marks.

Like Chrissy Teigen before her, Bidot flaunts her stretch marks with pride. “It’s an honor to be in the Lane Bryant ad featured in the pages of Sports Illustrated’s Swimsuit Issue, completely unretouched,” Bidot wrote on Instagram. “It’s amazing to be a part of the change that’s helping women see once and for all that nobody is perfect. We can still be beautiful in spite of our imperfections. It’s time to celebrate each other and learn to love the skin we’re in.” We couldn’t agree more. However, we wish that Bidot hadn’t referred to her stretch marks as “imperfections.” Nearly every woman on the face of this planet has stretch marks — they’re a feature, not a flaw. Part of building body confidence is finding more positive, accurate ways of describing our forms. Still, kudos to Bidot, Lane Bryant and Sports Illustrated for furthering the conversation.

[ via Allure ]

The post Model Denise Bidot Flaunts Her Stretch Marks in the Pages of Sports Illustrated appeared first on theFashionSpot.

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Republican governor: 'Serious constitutional concerns' about deploying the National Guard for immigration enforcement

ice immigration raid

Republican governors said they had “concerns” about a Friday Associated Press report regarding a leaked draft memo written by the Department of Homeland Security that proposed mobilizing as many as 100,000 National Guard troops to round up and deport unauthorized immigrants. 

The draft of the memo, which appeared to have been written by DHS Secretary John Kelly, mentioned mobilizing National Guard troops in 11 states as far north as Oregon. State governors could choose whether they wanted their National Guard troops to participate, according to the memo.

Republican governors were quick to react to the report on Friday morning.

“While we haven’t had any contact from the Administration in regard to this issue, I would have concerns about the utilization of National Guard resources for immigration enforcement with the current deployment responsibilities our guardsmen have overseas,” Arkansas Gov. Asa Hutchinson told Business Insider.

“During my time at Homeland Security, we utilized National Guard partnerships for specific responsibilities along the border, so the concept is fine, but it’s a matter of resources,” said Hutchinson, who served under President George W. Bush as the undersecretary for border transportation and security under after 9/11. “In Arkansas, I believe it would be too much of a strain on our National Guard personnel.”

Utah Gov. Gary Herbert told Business Insider that “while we cannot speculate as to what may be requested via official channels in the future, we have serious constitutional concerns about activating the National Guard to provide the mentioned services and the potential financial impacts of doing so.”

Hurricane Katrina National Guard

Mari St. Martin, the communications director for Nevada Gov. Brian Sandoval, told Business Insider that it hadn’t been contacted by DHS regarding the draft memo.

“It’s premature to comment on potential actions regarding the Nevada National Guard and its citizen-soldiers based entirely on a draft memo and outside speculation,” St. Martin said. “The governor said earlier this morning that he didn’t think it was an appropriate use of the guard.”

John Wittman, the press secretary for the Texas governor’s office, told Business Insider: “The Office of the Governor has not received, much less seen, a memo or request from the White House or Department of Homeland Security regarding the use of Texas National Guard troops for immigration enforcement. … The White House has adamantly denied there are efforts underway to mobilize the National Guard for this purpose.”

The Louisiana governor’s office told Business Insider that it hadn’t been contacted by the Trump administration regarding the memo. The Oklahoma governor’s office told Business Insider that it would be “premature to discuss” the memo, as the office hasn’t seen the document. The Colorado governor’s office also told Business Insider it hadn’t been contacted by the Trump administration.

A DHS representative told Business Insider that the AP report was “incorrect,” and that the department was “not considering mobilizing the National Guard for immigration enforcement.”

Sean Spicer, President Donald Trump’s press secretary, called the AP’s reporting “false” and “irresponsible” on Friday morning.

Sean Spicer

“It is irresponsible to be saying this,” Spicer said, according to a pool report. “There is no effort at all to round up — to utilize the National Guard to round up illegal immigrants. I wish you guys had asked before you tweeted.”

An AP reporter said that the wire service had requested comment from the White House multiple times before publishing. Spicer, meanwhile, said he didn’t know if the draft memo had been considered by the DHS and that he knew of “no effort to do what is potentially suggested.”

Another DHS official told Cox Media producer Dorey Scheimer that the immigration memo was “a very early, pre-decisional draft … and was never seriously considered by the department.”

Reaz Jafri, an immigration expert and a partner at Withers Bergman, told Business Insider on Friday morning that the DHS memo would be “subject to immediate legal challenges” because it would allow the National Guard to perform the function of Immigration and Customs Enforcement officials — including the “apprehension and detention of individuals that have committed no crime and may otherwise have a legal basis, under our immigration laws, to be in the US.”

Claude Arnold, a former ICE special agent who now works for Frontier Solutions, a Virginia-based crisis-management firm, told Business Insider that using the National Guard to enforce immigration laws is not “legally or practically feasible.”

Arnold pointed to the Posse Comitatus Act, a federal law that limits the power of military personnel to enforce domestic policies — like immigration laws — within the US. However, Arnold said that under the Bush Administration, National Guard forces were deployed along borders to act as “eyes and ears,” and provide supplementary equipment to assist CBP officials. 

The Trump administration has signed executive orders increasing the scope and abilities of both ICE and Customs and Border Protection officials to detain unauthorized immigrants. Trump himself said during the campaign that he would create a “deportation force” to round up unauthorized immigrants.

Business Insider has reached out to the governors’ offices in the 11 states affected by this memo and will update this story as we hear back.

Michelle Mark contributed to this report.

SEE ALSO: Trump administration weighs mobilizing National Guard for immigration roundups, according to draft memo

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NOW WATCH: Merriam-Webster can’t stop trolling the Trump administration on Twitter

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Honda plans extra MotoGP private pre-season test at Jerez

Honda is planning a private two-day MotoGP test at Jerez late next week for Marc Marquez and Dani Pedrosa

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F1 teams favour active suspension return to resolve row for 2018

The majority of Formula 1 teams agree the return of active ride would be the simplest way to clarify confusion surrounding the legality of suspension systems, Autosport has learned

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